What’s the matter with postprandial hypoglycemia in diabetics?

I was diagnosed with type 2 Diabetes and put on Metformin on June 26th, 2019. I started some diabetes diet and followed it 100% for a few weeks and could not get my blood sugar to go below 140. Finally i began to panic and called my doctor, he told me to get used to it. He said I would be on metformin my whole life and eventually insulin. At that point i knew something wasn’t right and began to do a lot of research. Then I found a diabetes website http://www.wellhealthplans.com/diabetestreatmentvideo I read that article from end to end because everything the writer was saying made absolute sense. I started the diet that day and the next morning my blood sugar was down to 100 and now i have a fasting blood sugar between Mid 70’s and the 80’s. My doctor took me off the metformin after just three week of being on this lifestyle change. I have lost over 30 pounds and 6+ inches around my waist in a month. The truth is we can get off the drugs and help myself by trying natural methods

Click Here to Watch the Diabetes Treatment Video

Many patients usually have elevated blood glucose levels after eating, but the opposite happens in some patients, especially women, who may experience post-meal hypoglycemia at some point. Long-term hypoglycemia can lead to diabetic complications, and diabetics should be vigilant. So, what’s wrong with postprandial hypoglycemia in diabetics?

I. How to understand postprandial blood sugar.

Experts explain that 2-hour postprandial blood glucose is a blood glucose measurement taken a full 2 hours after the first bite of food. You should take your medication, inject insulin and eat at the same time and in the same dosage as usual. The blood glucose level 2 hours after a meal is influenced by many factors such as the type of food eaten, the speed of gastric and intestinal movements, the amount of exercise after the meal and the blood glucose level before the meal.

How much blood glucose is low after a meal?

The normal value of preprandial blood glucose is 3.9-6.1mmol/L, and the normal value of postprandial blood glucose is less than 11.1mmol/L. However, based on the different physical and medical conditions of diabetic patients, so the normal blood glucose of diabetic patients 2 hours after a meal should be at least less than 11.1mmol/L, and preferably less than 7.8mmol/L, before it is normal. However, if it is less than 5mmol/L, it means postprandial hypoglycemia.

Causes of postprandial hypoglycemia in diabetics.

1.Excessive insulin secretion and delayed peak.

Under normal circumstances, blood glucose rises after a person eats, peaks in about 30 to 60 minutes and then drops, and plasma insulin levels also rise to peak in 30 to 60 minutes, 5 to 10 times the basal value, then drop and return to basal levels in 3 to 4 hours. Patients with type 2 diabetes may have excessive insulin secretion (hyperinsulinemia) and delayed peak levels, and their blood glucose may be low or even hypoglycemic after a meal because insulin is kept at a high concentration but cannot return to baseline levels.

Inadequate diet and excessive post-meal exercise.

Diet and exercise are two important cornerstones of diabetes treatment, with strict dietary control and appropriate exercise contributing to weight loss, improvement of hyperglycemia and reduction of hypoglycemic medications. However, the diet program should be strict and long-term, and exercise should be regular. If the diet is inadequate or the intensity of post-prandial exercise is too high, the patient may also have low post-prandial blood glucose, or even hypoglycemia.

3、Drug influence

Excessive doses of hypoglycemic medications, mismatch with the diet, or concomitant use of other medications that enhance the hypoglycemic effect of hypoglycemic medications may also result in a significant decrease in postprandial blood glucose.

4, diabetics after meal hypoglycemia how to do?

When the blood glucose 2 hours after a meal is lower than the blood glucose before a meal, you can first increase the frequency of monitoring, such as 1 hour after a meal, 3 hours after the blood glucose, record the data, so that it is easy to find the pattern of blood glucose changes. Then, consult your doctor to jointly analyze and find out the cause, and adjust diet, exercise and medication if necessary.

I was diagnosed with type 2 Diabetes and put on Metformin on June 26th, 2019. I started some diabetes diet and followed it 100% for a few weeks and could not get my blood sugar to go below 140. Finally i began to panic and called my doctor, he told me to get used to it. He said I would be on metformin my whole life and eventually insulin. At that point i knew something wasn’t right and began to do a lot of research. Then I found a diabetes website http://www.wellhealthplans.com/diabetestreatmentvideo I read that article from end to end because everything the writer was saying made absolute sense. I started the diet that day and the next morning my blood sugar was down to 100 and now i have a fasting blood sugar between Mid 70’s and the 80’s. My doctor took me off the metformin after just three week of being on this lifestyle change. I have lost over 30 pounds and 6+ inches around my waist in a month. The truth is we can get off the drugs and help myself by trying natural methods

Click Here to Watch the Diabetes Treatment Video

Lisa

About the Author: Lisa

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *