How to prevent diabetes in people with a family history of diabetes

I was diagnosed with type 2 Diabetes and put on Metformin on June 26th, 2019. I started some diabetes diet and followed it 100% for a few weeks and could not get my blood sugar to go below 140. Finally i began to panic and called my doctor, he told me to get used to it. He said I would be on metformin my whole life and eventually insulin. At that point i knew something wasn’t right and began to do a lot of research. Then I found a diabetes website http://www.wellhealthplans.com/diabetestreatmentvideo I read that article from end to end because everything the writer was saying made absolute sense. I started the diet that day and the next morning my blood sugar was down to 100 and now i have a fasting blood sugar between Mid 70’s and the 80’s. My doctor took me off the metformin after just three week of being on this lifestyle change. I have lost over 30 pounds and 6+ inches around my waist in a month. The truth is we can get off the drugs and help myself by trying natural methods

Click Here to Watch the Diabetes Treatment Video

People with a family history of diabetes tend to be at a high risk of developing diabetes, which is 20 times higher than the general population, making it all the more important to be proactive in preventing it.

Expert studies have found that the prevalence of diabetes is significantly higher in people with a family history of diabetes than in the normal population. The chances of children whose parents have diabetes are 15 to 20 times higher than those of ordinary people. Moreover, the number of children with diabetes in China now accounts for 5% of all diabetics, and the rate of increase is 10% every year. Experts remind: If you have a family history of diabetes, you should check your blood sugar regularly after the age of 20; if you are still obese, you should pay attention to your blood sugar problem earlier.

The three lines of defense against family history of diabetes are.

primary prevention

The incidence of diabetes can be minimized by establishing the right eating habits and adopting a proper lifestyle. Diabetes mellitus is a non-communicable disease, and although there are certain genetic factors in its occurrence, it is the acquired life and environmental factors that play a key role. Excessive caloric intake, obesity, and lack of exercise are known to be important factors in the development of diabetes. Low-sugar, low-salt, low-fat, high-fiber, high vitamin diet is the best way to prevent diabetes. Regular monitoring of weight is essential to maintain weight at normal levels over time. When you gain weight, restrict your diet and increase your exercise to bring it back down to normal as soon as possible.

Make exercise an important part of life and a lifelong habit. Exercise not only burns excess calories and maintains muscle mass, but it also increases feelings of fullness and euphoria. Of course, exercise should be scientific and artistic, and should be carried out gradually, according to your ability, taking care of your interests, and in companionship, so as to obtain easy results and persevere. It is important to quit smoking and drinking less alcohol, and to eliminate all bad habits. People at high risk who have parents with diabetes but are obese, over-eating, have high blood sugar and lack exercise should pay particular attention to prevention.

Secondary prevention

Regular blood glucose testing for early detection of asymptomatic diabetes. Blood glucose measurement should be a routine part of medical check-ups for the elderly, even if they are healthy, and should still be done regularly. Any signs of diabetes, such as abnormal skin sensation, decreased sexual function, poor vision, polyuria, cataracts, etc., should be measured in time for early diagnosis and early treatment. It is necessary to mobilize diet, exercise, drugs and other means to control blood glucose in a stable and long-term normal or close to normal level. Fasting blood glucose should be less than 6.11 millimoles per liter, 2 hours after a meal should be less than 9.44 millimoles per liter, and glycated hemoglobin, an indicator of chronic blood glucose level, should be less than 7.0%. Blood lipids, blood pressure, and electrocardiogram should also be measured periodically, as these are indirect indicators of blood glucose control.

Triple prevention

The goal is to prevent or delay the onset and progression of chronic complications of diabetes and to reduce disability and mortality. Diabetics are prone to complications of other chronic diseases, and are prone to life-threatening complications. Therefore, it is important to strengthen the monitoring of chronic complications of diabetes to achieve early detection. Early diagnosis and early treatment of diabetes can often prevent the occurrence of complications and enable patients to lead a near-normal life in the long term.

I was diagnosed with type 2 Diabetes and put on Metformin on June 26th, 2019. I started some diabetes diet and followed it 100% for a few weeks and could not get my blood sugar to go below 140. Finally i began to panic and called my doctor, he told me to get used to it. He said I would be on metformin my whole life and eventually insulin. At that point i knew something wasn’t right and began to do a lot of research. Then I found a diabetes website http://www.wellhealthplans.com/diabetestreatmentvideo I read that article from end to end because everything the writer was saying made absolute sense. I started the diet that day and the next morning my blood sugar was down to 100 and now i have a fasting blood sugar between Mid 70’s and the 80’s. My doctor took me off the metformin after just three week of being on this lifestyle change. I have lost over 30 pounds and 6+ inches around my waist in a month. The truth is we can get off the drugs and help myself by trying natural methods

Click Here to Watch the Diabetes Treatment Video

Lisa

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